Monaco- Alain Ducasse Louis XV- ✪✪✪

I could literally have not picked a more Monaco-y moment to visit Monaco's soul 3-star restaurant—Grand Prix weekend in Monte Carlo is truly a bucket-list type activity. Crowds throng outside the doors, and White House-level security is everywhere. Shitloads of plastic surgery. Serious people in suits.

 Dominique Lory, Head Chef

Dominique Lory, Head Chef

The Louis XV is run by a youngish chef named Dominique Lory; born in '79, he spent a few years working for Pierre Gagnaire and then for Alain Ducasse at the Louis XV under Franck Cerutti, and then in Paris at the Plaza Athénée. In 2011, Ducasse sent him back to Monaco as head chef of his (arguably) European flagship while Franck Cerruti became the head of all Hôtel de Paris' restaurants, with Dominique reporting to him. 

 Louis XV Main Dining Room

Louis XV Main Dining Room

The room's gorgeous central light hangs like a crown over the dining room. Recently redesigned, the first-floor restaurant of the famous Hôtel de Paris has an open, airy, turbo-luxurious feel. In the center is a service station built of metal and mulberry wood that discreetly frames the work of the staff. Designed and built by Parisian architects Patrick Jouin and Sanjit Manku, the design is meant to memorialize the gravitas and glory of the old-world restaurant with a modern spin. I'd say they nailed it.

MONTE CARLO, MONACO

SERVICE: 9.0/10

FOOD: 8.5/10

PRICE PAID: $450 PP (RACE MENU; LIST PRICE- PRE-CHALLENGE)

VALUE/MONEY: 7.0/10

FINAL SCORE: 8.5/10

 Hotel de Paris Exterior

Hotel de Paris Exterior

 Hotel de Paris Lobby

Hotel de Paris Lobby

The Hôtel de Paris, itself at the very epicenter of Monte Carlo and across from the famous casino, has some interesting history. Back in the late 80s, Monaco's Prince Rainier III challenged Alain Ducasse to build a 3-Michelin-Star restaurant in the hotel in less than four years, a goal that Alain crushed in only three. Especially impressive since, at the time Alain began, there were zero three-stars in hotels, and Alain had only achieved two-star status with his previous restaurant.

As far as the hotel itself goes, opulence is just a word. I checked, and for their nicest suites this hotel charges more than €10,000 per night with a straight face. 

 First Bites- Summer Rolls, 8/10

First Bites- Summer Rolls, 8/10

First out, a Meditteranean take on summer rolls—cracklingly fresh vegetables in rice paper with a rich and zesty olive sauce. The spoon-shaped wooden skewers are a nice touch. 8/10, a straightforward but pleasant start. 

 First Bites: Local Fish 9/10 

First Bites: Local Fish 9/10 

A slightly more adventuresome next step, both in flavors and colors—local fish marinated with vegetables that subtly enhance the colors of the fish itself. There are small cuts of cuttlefish, red mullet, mackerel, and skipjack tuna. Super, super fresh, like it was just plucked out of the ocean. 9/10.

 Bread

Bread

 Butter + Salt, 8/10

Butter + Salt, 8/10

Rich, yeasty bread served alongside a swirl of butter on a small marble block, and salt. 8/10.

 Course 1: "Gamberoni from San Remo," 8/10

Course 1: "Gamberoni from San Remo," 8/10

First up on the main courses, Gamberoni, a type of prawn, with jellyfish, a gorgeous centerpiece of caviar, and rockfish on the bottom. Interestingly, the dish is served quite cold, and the all the flavors play well with the jellyfish, whose textures overrides most of the dish. 8/10.

 Course 2: "Cookpot of Spring Vegetables + Mushrooms," 10/10

Course 2: "Cookpot of Spring Vegetables + Mushrooms," 10/10

Every now and then I encounter a dish that totally changes my mind on a whole genre of food. This dish did it for me with vegetables. Mushroom, carrot, asparagus, peas, and turnip in a shockingly rich green pea juice. The juice itself is made by putting fresh raw peas in an extractor, not cooked, with lime, sorrel, and mustard... and that's it! By avoiding cooking the vegetables, the chef maintains the freshness of the dish and keeps it balanced by not mixing fresh with cooked ingredients.

The peas themselves are all briely roasted, and they pop they're so fresh. The whole dish has a smooth and silky mouthfeel; this is easily the best vegetable dish I have ever had. 10/10. 

 Course 3: Mediterranean Seabass, 9/10

Course 3: Mediterranean Seabass, 9/10

 Post-Broth

Post-Broth

Next, a gloriously-plated dish of Sea bass with tomatoes, olive oil, fennel, and kumquats, in a lovely warm sauce. The flavors work together near-perfectly, and this dish is an excellent showcase of the amazing product available to the kitchen in this Mediterranean haven. 9/10. 

 Course 4: Guinea Fowl, 9/10

Course 4: Guinea Fowl, 9/10

A second knockout in a row—some truly excellent, incredibly fresh, and perfectly prepared Guinea fowl for the main course. Lightly pan-fried with a nice harkening back to the veggies course from the peas and mushrooms, this hearty and classic dish is a slam-dunk. The protein is tender, warm, and pairs perfectly with everything on the plate. 9/10. 

 Waldorf Salad Granita, 8/10

Waldorf Salad Granita, 8/10

As a palate cleanser prior to the finishing courses, a granité (granita) of Waldorf salad. Simple and elegant, I will admit that it tastes a lot like a lettuce icee, but it more than does the job. 8/10. 

 Course 5: Cheese Cart, 9/10

Course 5: Cheese Cart, 9/10

Alain Ducasse Louis XV (19 of 29).jpg

You would expect this place to have just a princely Maybach of a cheese cart, and you would have your expectations met. Showcasing cheeses from Southern France, Italy, and Switzerland, I selected (from upper left clockwise):

  • Fébus
  • Roquefort, exceptionally strong and salty
  • Petit fiancé
  • Camembert
  • Comte. All excellent. 9/10. 
 Course 5B: "Salad a L'Occasion," 7/10

Course 5B: "Salad a L'Occasion," 7/10

As we are consuming the cheeses, a young man hard at work at the center of the restaurant with an enormous mobile cart full of greens brings us a freshly prepared "Salad a l'occasion." It appears to just be some leafy greens. I haven't had such a salad before offered mid-cheese-course as it is, but it's not unwelcome. 7/10.

 Hand cleanser

Hand cleanser

To clean our hands, a beautiful dish of water perfumed with orange blossoms is offered to us. An extremely classy gesture. 

 Course 6: Strawberry + Mascarpone Sorbet, 9/10 

Course 6: Strawberry + Mascarpone Sorbet, 9/10 

Spanish strawberries for dessert, served with a mascarpone sorbet. 9/10. 

 Course 7: Candied Nuts, 8/10 

Course 7: Candied Nuts, 8/10 

A crunchy, sugary interlude of candied nuts are offered. Kind of like the salad a l'occasion, I'm not really sure why and I haven't seen anything like it before, but it's kind of fun. 8/10.

 Tea Cart

Tea Cart

Though only some of the table partook, I wanted to share a photo of their incredible herbal tea cart which includes potted, growing plants used as infusions for the tea served tableside. 

 Last Bites: Candied Fruit, 8/10

Last Bites: Candied Fruit, 8/10

Some super-sugary candied fruits; limoncello, bamago, and mango. 8/10. 

 Last Sips: Coffee from Laos, 8/10

Last Sips: Coffee from Laos, 8/10

 Last Sips: Espresso, 9/10

Last Sips: Espresso, 9/10

For some reason, I'm offered two caffeinated beverages on departure: some coffee from Laos, sweet and floral, as well as a particularly rich and well-made espresso from Brazil that help round out the meal and give me the caffeine boost I will later need to fight through drunken crowds of pre-race revelers outside.

 Last Bites: Chocolate, 9/10

Last Bites: Chocolate, 9/10

What the menu describes as "chocolates from our factory"—Black chocolate from Peru, and milk chocolate from Brazil. Rich and amazing, it's a great advertisement for the boxes of chocolate they sell at the hostess stand on the way out. 9/10. 

 Last Bites: Yuzu Marmalade + Yuzu Sorbet, 9/10

Last Bites: Yuzu Marmalade + Yuzu Sorbet, 9/10

Marmalade of yuzu with a yuzu sorbet; soft, dairy-infused citrus flavors. A perfect finish. 9/10.